#DBT

EP 15- Sherry Bonoan Asuncion on the Power of Choice, Self-Love and the Healing Journey

On this 15th episode we have Sherry Asuncion!

Sherry is an example of the importance of practicing mindfulness and self love. She is certified as a Gut Health Coach, Mindfulness and Meditation Instructor & Life Coach, Reiki II and Theta Healer Practitioner, CBD/Cannabis Coach and provider of beautiful & unique crystals. After suffering in silence for 5 yrs with mystery symptoms, she was diagnosed with Hashimotos, an autoimmune thyroid disease, which eventually led her to leave her 12 year career in the public sector and go back to school and obtain her certifications to start her businesses. Her path led her to yet another challenge to overcome when her 13 yr marriage came to a traumatic ending. This is when she began her journey to awakening, following her spiritual healing path. She believes in the practice of mindfulness and the importance of self/unconditional love with oneself in order to obtain happiness within and embrace the opportunities that the world has to offer.

This episode covers the following topics and points:

-Sherry’s definition of mindfulness and early experiences with learning the practice

-Her journey of triumph after experiencing trauma from a relationship

-Choosing yourself over the expectations of others

-Self-love, self-compassion, and self-acceptance

-An explanation of love and kindness exercises from Sherry’s self-love related classes

-A step-by-step explanation of a mirror work activity for improved self-love and acceptance

-The power of CHOICE, perspective, energetic release and meditation

I hope you enjoy this episode as much as I did! Please check Sherry out and connect with her via IG and FB @resilienthealthcoach and resilienthealthcoach.com.

“Love Yourself!”
-Sherry

EP 9- A Perspective on Imposter Syndrome

In this episode I discuss the following:

-A brief description on what Imposter Syndrome is

-My perspective on this syndrome from a cognitive behavioral and schema therapy framework

-Educational information on ways to move THROUGH the thoughts and feelings associated with imposter syndrome

-How to “build the faith” in your capabilities, competencies, skills and overall worth

For anyone who listens to this, know that I appreciate you SO much.

Dr. L

EP 6- Stress vs. Anxiety

This episode covers the following:

-The difference between stress and anxiety

-Controlling responses to stressors with mindfulness

-Controlling responses to stressors with thought reframing

-Examples of acceptance versus thought reframing and why these are helpful

Grounding Your Body In A Crisis

What exactly is a crisis?

According to the awesome Dr. Marsha Linehan, creator of Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (DBT), a crisis is considered a highly stressful, short-term (meaning it isn’t going to last forever) situation that causes a sense of pressure to resolve the crisis immediately. A crisis situation is subjective, as not everyone views every situation the same. For example, giving a presentation in front of your boss and the team while you’re also afraid of public speaking may seem like a crisis to one person, but not another. Realizing you can’t pay your rent this month may seem like a crisis to one person, but not another. You get my point. During a crisis, we can use distress tolerance tools when we feel intense emotional discomfort (anxiety, panic, anger) which also can lead to discomfort in the body (e.g. rapid heartbeat, hyperventilating, dizziness, tunnel vision). We should especially use tools when we feel like this and still need to GET. STUFF. DONE (e.g. take your kids to school, work, attend class). Dr. Marsha Linehan calls tools to help these types of situations “Crisis Survival Skills.” One acronym she created is TIP, which stands for Tip the Temperature, Intense Exercise, Paced Breathing and Paired Muscle relaxation.

One way to sort of “shock your system” out of a fight-flight response is to use cold water with the Tip the Temperature technique. It is suggested to hold your breath and dunk your face in a bowl of cold water, but I also think putting hands or feet in cold water or taking a cold shower is effective. From my knowledge, I know that shocking yourself with cold water immediately stops whatever thought process you’re having that is contributing to interpreting your situation as a crisis (how very CBT of me lol), which can help slow down or stop the fight-flight response. It also increases alertness and helps you focus if you’re starting to panic or experience intense emotions to the point of feeling overwhelmed.

In regard to Intense Exercise, when we are in a fight-flight response (experiencing anxiety, panic, and even anger) we need to do something with all those chemicals our body is releasing to keep us safe from danger (our body is trying to do us a favor, but little does it know that giving a presentation is not an immediate life-or-death situation). Use that energy to avoid that shaky, dizzy, lightheaded feeling we can get when feeling overwhelmed. Go for a brisk walk, do pushups, jumping jacks, jog, shake about like a little kid who has heard music for the first time. Sometimes I stand on my tippy toes and pulse over and over as a way to burn off excess adrenaline. Try it. 😉

With Paced Breathing, in a nutshell you need to breathe DEEP, SLOW, FULLY, and WITH YOUR BELLY. Push your belly out as you inhale and keep going (slowly) until your lungs fill up fully, then exhale (slowly) with your mouth the size of a Cheerio until all the air is gone, and repeat. A trick is to breathe in 4 seconds every round, and breathe out longer than you breathe in (so breathing out 5, 6 or 7 seconds, every round). You will notice I state this breathing method A LOT in my posts. It activates your parasympathetic system which is key to calming down in a crisis situation.

Regarding the Paired Muscle Relaxation, the DBT technique indicates you tense your body muscles while breathing IN with your belly, and releasing your muscles as you exhale. If you want a different method of relaxing muscles, I suggest actually clenching various parts of your body (feet, calves, gluteus [yep, your butt], stomach, back, raise your shoulders up toward your ears, make fists with your hands, and scrunch of your face TIGHT), and hold for 15 seconds, then release. Aaaaahhhh…feels good.

I obviously added my own spin on some of these as this is all a collaborative effort. I want you all to have as much control over yourself as possible, and when faced with a crisis it is imperative to ground your body so you can GET. STUFF. DONE.

You are all amazing. Don’t forget.

Love,

Dr. L